Boring meta-post of the year

Really, it’s the second boring meta-post of the year, since I’ve already posted this one.

There were some rumours recently that the Scienceblogs blog network would shut down the site. It appears to still be up, and there are still blogs going there, so I don’t know about that, but this reminded me that Scienceblogs existed. I don’t think I’ve read anything on Scienceblogs in years, but it was one of my inspirations when I started blogging. It’s not that I wanted to be a science writer, but Scienceblogs and the also now defunct ResearchBlogging RSS feed (Fausto & al 2012) made me figure out that blogging about science was a thing people did.

Slowly, this thing took shape and became a ”science community blog”, in the terminology of Saunders & al (2017). That is, this blog is not so much about outreach or popular science, but ”aimed at the academic community”. I think of it as part of a conversation about genetics, even if it may be largely a conversation with myself.

So what is the state of the blog now? In September 2016, I decided to try to post once or twice a month (and also to make sure that both posts weren’t pointless filler posts). This panned out pretty well up until October 2017, when I ran out of steam for a while. Probably unrelated to that, 2017 was also the year my blog traffic suddenly increased by more than a factor of two. I don’t know for sure why, but looking at the numbers of individual posts, it seems the increase is because a lot of R users are looking for tidyverse-related things. If I went by viewer statistics, I would post less about genetics and more about hip R packages.

Instead, 2018 I will:

  • Attempt to keep up the pace of writing one or two things every month. Some, but not all, of them will be pointless fillers.
  • Hopefully produce a couple of posts about papers, if those things get out of the pipeline eventually. The problem with this, as anyone who writes papers knows, is that once something is out of the pipeline, one has grown so enormously tired of it.
  • Write a few more posts about other scientific papers I read. I’ve heard that there is limited interest in that sorts of thing, but I enjoy it, and writing should make me think harder about what I read.
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