Griffin & Nesseth ”The science of Orphan Black: the official companion”

I didn’t know that science fiction series Orphan Black actually had a real Cosima: Cosima Herter, science consultant. After reading this interview and finishing season 5, I realised that there is also a new book I needed to read: The science of Orphan Black: The official companion by PhD candidate in development, stem cells and regenerative medicine Casey Griffin and science communicator Nina Nesseth with a foreword by Cosima Hertner.

(Warning: This post contains serious spoilers for Orphan Black, and a conceptual spoiler for GATTACA.)

One thing about science fiction struck me when I was watching the last episodes of Orphan Black: Sometimes it makes a lot more sense if we don’t believe everything the fictional scientists tell us. Like real scientists, they may be wrong, or they may be exaggerating. The genetically segregated future of GATTACA becomes no less chilling when you realise that the silly high predictive accuracies claimed are likely just propaganda from a oppressive society. And as you realise that the dying P.T. Westmorland is an imposter, you can break your suspension of disbelief about LIN28A as a fountain of youth gene … Of course, genetics is a little more complicated than that, and he is just another rich dude who wants science to make him live forever.

However, it wouldn’t be Orphan Black if there weren’t a basis in reality: there are several single gene mutations in model animals (e.g. Kenyon & al 1993) that can make them live a lot longer than normal, and LIN28A is involved in ageing (reviewed by Jun-Hao & al 2016). It’s not out of the question that an engineered single gene disruption that substantially increases longevity in humans could be possible. Not practical, and not necessarily without unpleasant side effects, but not out of the question.

Orphan Black was part slightly scary adventure, part festival of ideas about science and society, part character-driven web of relationships, and part, sadly, bricolage of clichés. I found when watching season five that I’d forgotten most of the plots of seasons two through four, and I will probably never make the effort to sit through them again. The first and last seasons make up for it, though.

The series seems to have been set on squeezing as many different biological concepts as possible in there, so the book has to try to do the same. It has not just clones and transgenes, but also gene therapy, stem cells, prion disease, telomeres, dopamine, ancient DNA, stem cells in cosmetics and so on. Two chapters try valiantly to make sense of the clone disease and the cure. It shows that the authors have encyclopedic knowledge of life science, with a special interest in development and stem cells.

But I think they slightly oversell how accurate the show is. Like when Cosima tells Scott to ”run a PCR on these samples, see if there are any genetic markers” and ”can you sequence for cytochrome c?”, and Scott replies ”the barcode gene? that’s the one we use for species differentiation” … That’s what screen science is like. The right words, but not always in the right order.

Cosima and Scott sciencing at university, before everything went pear-shaped. One of the good thing about Orphan Black was the scientist characters. There was a ton of them! The good ones, geniuses with sparse resources and self experimentation, the evil ones, well funded and deeply unethical, and Delphine. This scene is an exception in that it plays the cringe-inducing nerd angle. Cosima and Scott grew after than this.

There are some scientific oddities. They must be impossible to avoid. For example, the section on epigenetics treats it as a completely new field, sort of missing the history of the subfield. DNA methylation research was going on already in the 1970s (Gitschier 2009). Genomic imprinting, arguably the only solid example of transgenerational epigenetic effects in humans, and X inactivation were both being discovered during 70s and 80s (reviewed by Ferguson-Smith 2011). The book also makes a hash of genome sequencing, which is a shame but understandable. It would have taken a lot of effort to disentangle how sequencing worked when the fictional clone experiment started and how it got to how it works in season five, when Cosima runs Nanopore sequencing.

The idea of human cloning is evocative. Orphan Black flipped it on its head by making the main clone characters strikingly different. It also cleverly acknowledged that human cloning is a somewhat dated 20th century idea, and that the cutting edge of life science has moved on. But I wish the book had been harder on the premise of the clone experiment:

By cloning the human genome and fostering a set of experimental subjects from birth, the scientists behind the project would gain many insights into the inner workings of the human body, from the relay of genetic code into observable traits (called phenotypes), to the viability of manipulated DNA as a potential therapeutic tool, to the effects of environmental factors on genetics. It’s a scientifically beautiful setup to learn myriad things about ourselves as humans, and the doctors at Dyad were quick to jump at that opportunity. (Chapter 1)

This is the very problem. Of course, sometimes ethically atrocious fictional science would, in principle, generate useful knowledge. But when when fictional science is near useless, let’s not pretend that it would produce a lot of valuable knowledge. When it comes to genetics and complex traits like human health, small sample studies of this kind (even if it was using clones) would be utterly useless. Worse than useless, they would likely be biased and misleading.

Researchers still float the idea of a ”baseline”, though, but in the form of a cell line, where it makes more sense. See the the (Human) Genome Project-write (Boeke & al 2016), suggesting the construction of an ideal baseline cell line for understanding human genome function:

Additional pilot projects being considered include … developing a homozygous reference genome bearing the most common pan-human allele (or allele ancestral to a given human population) at each position to develop cells powered by ”baseline” human genomes. Comparison with this baseline will aid in dissecting complex phenotypes, such as disease susceptibility.

In the end, the most important part of science in science fiction isn’t to be a factually correct, nor to be a coherent prediction about the future. If Orphan Black has raised interest in science, and I’m sure it has, that is great. And if it has stimulated discussions about the relationship between biological science, culture and ethics, that is even better.

The timeline of when relevant scientific discoveries happened in the real world and in Orphan Black is great. The book has a partial bibliography. The ”Clone Club Q&A” boxes range from silly fun to great open questions.

Orphan Black was probably the best genetics TV show around, and this book is a wonderful companion piece.

Plaque at the Roslin Institute to the sheep that haunts Orphan Black. ”Baa.”

Literature

Boeke, JD et al (2016) The genome project-write. Science.

Ferguson-Smith, AC (2011) Genomic imprinting: the emergence of an epigenetic paradigm. Nature reviews Genetics.

Gitschier, J. (2009). On the track of DNA methylation: An interview with Adrian Bird. PLOS Genetics.

Jun-Hao, E. T., Gupta, R. R., & Shyh-Chang, N. (2016). Lin28 and let-7 in the Metabolic Physiology of Aging. Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Kenyon, C., Chang, J., Gensch, E., Rudner, A., & Tabtiang, R. (1993). A C. elegans mutant that lives twice as long as wild type. Nature, 366(6454), 461-464.

Annonser

”These are all fairly obvious” (says Sewall Wright)

I was checking a quote from Sewall Wright, and it turned out that the whole passage was delightful. Here it is, from volume 1 of Genetics and the Evolution of Populations (pages 59-60):

There are a number of broad generalizations that follow from this netlike relationship between genome and complex characters. These are all fairly obvious but it may be well to state them explicitly.

1) The variations of most characters are affected by a great many loci (the multiple factor hypothesis).

2) In general, each gene replacement has effects on many characters (the principle of universal pleiotropy).

3) Each of the innumerable possible alleles at any locus has a unique array of differential effects on taking account of pleiotropy (uniqueness of alleles).

4) The dominance relation of two alleles is not an attribute of them but of the whole genome and of the environment. Dominance may differ for each pleiotropic effect and is in general easily modifiable (relativity of dominance).

5) The effects of multiple loci on a character in general involve much nonadditive interaction (universality of interaction effects).

6) Both ontogenetic and phylogenetic homology depend on calling into play similar chains of gene-controlled reactions under similar developmental conditions (homology).

7) The contributions of measurable characters to overall selective value usually involve interaction effects of the most extreme sort because of the usually intermediate position of the optimum grade, a situation that implies the existence of innumerable different selective peaks (multiple selective peaks).

What can we say about this?

It seems point one is true. People may argue about whether the variants behind complex traits are many, relatively common, with tiny individual effects or many, relatively rare, and with larger effects that average out to tiny effects when measured in the whole population. In any case, there are many causative variants, alright.

Point two — now also known as the omnigenetic model — hinges on how you read ”in general”, I guess. In some sense, universal pleiotropy follows from genome crowding. If there are enough causative variants and a limited number of genes, eventually every gene will be associated with every trait.

I don’t think that point three is true. I would assume that many loss of function mutations to protein coding genes, for example, would be interchangeable.

I don’t really understand points six and seven, about homology and fitness landscapes, that well. The later section about homology reads to me as if it could be part of a debate going on at the time. Number seven describes Wright’s view of natural selection as a kind of fitness whack-a-mole, where if a genotype is fit in one dimension, it probably loses in some other. The hypothesis and the metaphor have been extremely influential — I think largely because many people thought that it was wrong in many different ways.

Points four and five are related and, I imagine, the most controversial of the list. Why does Wright say that there is universal epistasis? Because of physiological genetics. Or, in modern parlance, maybe because of gene networks and systems biology. On page 71, he puts it like this:

Interaction effects necessarily occur with respect to the ultimate products of chains of metabolic processes in which each step is controlled by a different locus. This carries with it the implication that interaction effects are universal in the more complex characters that trace such processes.

The argument seems to persists to this day, and I think it is true. On the other hand, there is the question how much this matters to the variants that actually segregate in a given population and affect a given trait.

This is often framed as a question of variance. It turns out that even with epistatic gene action, in many cases, most of the genetic variance is still additive (Mäki-Tanila & Hill 2014, Huang & Mackay 2014). But something similar must apply to the effects that you will see from a locus. They also depend on the allele frequencies at other loci. An interaction does nothing when one of the interaction partners are fixed. If they are nearly to fixed, it will do nearly nothing. If they’re all at intermediate frequency, things become more interesting.

Wright’s principle of universal interaction is also grounded in his empirical work. A lot of space in this book is devoted to results from pigmentation genetics in guinea pigs, which includes lots of dominance and interaction. It could be that Wright was too quick to generalise from guinea pig coat colours to other traits. It could be that working in a system consisting of inbred lines draws your attention to nonlinearities that are rare and marginal in the source populations. On the other hand, it’s in these systems we can get a good handle on the dominance and interaction that may be missed elsewhere.

Study of effects in combination indicates a complicated network of interacting processes with numerous pleiotropic effects. There is no reason to suppose that a similar analysis of any character as complicated as melanin pigmentation would reveal a simpler genetic system. The inadequacy of any evolutionary theory that treats genes as if they had constant effects, favourable or unfavourable, irrespective of the rest of the genome, seems clear. (p. 88)

I’m not that well versed in pigmentation genetics, but I hope that someone is working on this. In an era where we can identify the molecular basis of classical genetic variants, I hope that someone keeps track of all these A, C, P, Q etc, and to what extent they’ve been mapped.

Literature

Wright, Sewall. ”Genetics and the Evolution of Populations” Volume 1 (1968).

Mäki-Tanila, Asko, and William G. Hill. ”Influence of gene interaction on complex trait variation with multilocus models.” Genetics 198.1 (2014): 355-367.

Huang, Wen, and Trudy FC Mackay. ”The genetic architecture of quantitative traits cannot be inferred from variance component analysis.” PLoS genetics 12.11 (2016): e1006421.

20170705_183042.jpg

Yours truly outside the library on Thomas Bayes’ road, incredibly happy with having found the book.

Summer of data science 1: Genomic prediction machines #SoDS17

Genetics is a data science, right?

One of my Summer of data science learning points was to play with out of the box prediction tools. So let’s try out a few genomic prediction methods. The code is on GitHub, and the simulated data are on Figshare.

Genomic selection is the happy melding of quantitative and molecular genetics. It means using genetic markers en masse to predict traits and and make breeding decisions. It can give you better accuracy in choosing the right plants or animals to pair, and it can allow you to take shortcuts by DNA testing individuals instead of having to test them or their offspring for the trait. There are a bunch of statistical models that can be used for genomic prediction. Now, the choice of prediction algorithm is probably not the most important part of genomic selection, but bear with me.

First, we need some data. For this example, I used AlphaSim (Faux & al 2016), and the AlphaSim graphical user interface, to simulate a toy breeding population. We simulate 10 chromosomes á 100 cM, with 100 additively acting causal variants and 2000 genetic markers per chromosome. The initial genotypes come from neutral simulations. We run one generation of random mating, then three generations of selection on trait values. Each generation has 1000 individuals, with 25 males and 500 females breeding.

So we’re talking a small-ish population with a lot of relatedness and reproductive skew on the male side. We will use the two first two generations of selection (2000 individuals) to train, and try to predict the breeding values of the fourth generation (1000 individuals). Let’s use two of the typical mixed models used for genomic selection, and two tree methods.

We start by splitting the dataset and centring the genotypes by subtracting the mean of each column. Centring will not change predictions, but it may help with fitting the models (Strandén & Christensen 2011).

Let’s begin with the workhorse of genomic prediction: the linear mixed model where all marker coefficients are drawn from a normal distribution. This works out to be the same as GBLUP, the GCTA model, GREML, … a beloved child has many names. We can fit it with the R package BGLR. If we predict values for the held-out testing generation and compare with the real (simulated) values, it looks like this. The first panel shows a comparison with phenotypes, and the second with breeding values.

This gives us correlations of 0.49 between prediction and phenotype, and 0.77 between prediction and breeding value.

This is a plot of the Markov chain Monte Carlo we use to sample from the model. If a chain behaves well, it is supposed to have converged on the target distribution, and there is supposed to be low autocorrelation. Here is a trace plot of four chains for the marker variance (with the coda package). We try to be responsible Bayesian citizens and run the analysis multiple times, and with four chains we get very similar results from each of them, and a potential scale reduction factor of 1.01 (it should be close to 1 when it works). But the autocorrelation is high, so the chains do not explore the posterior distribution very efficiently.

BGLR can also fit a few of the ”Bayesian alphabet” variants of the mixed model. They put different priors on the distribution of marker coefficients allow for large effect variants. BayesB uses a mixture prior, where a lot of effects are assumed to be zero (Meuwissen, Hayes & Goddard 2001). The way we simulated the dataset is actually close to the BayesB model: a lot of variants have no effect. However, mixture models like BayesB are notoriously difficult to fit — and in this case, it clearly doesn’t work that well. The plots below show chains for two BayesB parameters, with potential scale reduction factors of 1.4 and 1.5. So, even if the model gives us the same accuracy as ridge regression (0.77), we can’t know if this reflects what BayesB could do.

On to the trees! Let’s try Random forest and Bayesian additive regression trees (BART). Regression trees make models as bifurcating trees. Something like the regression variant of: ”If the animal has a beak, check if it has a venomous spur. If it does, say that it’s a platypus. If it doesn’t, check whether it quacks like a duck …” The random forest makes a lot of trees on random subsets of the data, and combines the inferences from them. BART makes a sum of trees. Both a random forest (randomForest package) and a BART model on this dataset (fit with bartMachine package), gives a lower accuracy — 0.66 for random forest and 0.72 for BART. This is not so unexpected, because the strength of tree models seems to lie in capturing non-additive effects. And this dataset, by construction, has purely additive inheritance. Both BART and random forest have hyperparameters that one needs to set. I used package defaults for random forest, values that worked well for Waldmann (2016), but one probably should choose them by cross validation.

Finally, we can use classical quantitative genetics to estimate breeding values from the pedigree and relatives’ trait values. Fitting the so called animal model in two ways (pedigree package and MCMCglmm) give accuracies of 0.59 and 0.60.

So, in summary, we recover the common wisdom that the linear mixed model does the job well. It was more accurate than just pedigree, and a bit better than BART. Of course, the point of this post is not to make a fair comparison of methods. Also, the real magic of genomic selection, presumably, happens on every step of the way. How do you get to that neat individual-by-marker matrix in the first place, how do you deal with missing data and data from different sources, what and when do you measure, what do you do with the predictions … But you knew that already.

Journal club of one: ”An expanded view of complex traits: from polygenic to omnigenic”

An expanded view of complex traits: from polygenic to omnigenic” by Boyle, Yang & Pritchard (2017) came out recently in Cell. It has been all over Twitter, and I’m sure it will influence a lot of people’s thinking — rightfully so. It is a good read, pulls in a lot of threads, and has a nice blend of data analysis and reasoning. It’s good. Go read it!

The paper argues that for a lot of quantitative traits — specifically human diseases and height — almost every gene will be associated with every trait. More than that, almost every gene will be causally involved in every trait, most in indirect ways.

It continues with the kind of analysis used in Pickrell (2014), Finucane & al (2015) among many others, that break genome-wide association down down by genome annotation. How much variability can we attribute to variants in open chromatin regions? How much to genes annotated as ”protein bindning”? And so on.

These analyses point towards gene regulation being important, but not that strongly towards particular annotation terms or pathways. The authors take this to mean that, while genetic mapping, including GWAS, finds causally involved genes, it will not necessarily find ”relevant” genes. That is, not necessarily genes that are the central regulators of the trait. That may be a problem if you want to use genetic mapping to find drug targets, pathways to engineer, or similar.

This observation must speak to anyone who has looked at a list of genes from some mapping effort and thought: ”well, that is mostly genes we know nothing about … and something related to cancer”.

They write:

In summary, for a variety of traits, the largest-effect variants are modestly enriched in specific genes or pathways that may play direct roles in disease. However, the SNPs that contribute the bulk of the heritability tend to be spread across the genome and are not near genes with disease-specific functions. The clearest pattern is that the association signal is broadly enriched in regions that are transcriptionally active or involved in transcriptional regulation in disease-relevant cell types but absent from regions that are transcriptionally inactive in those cell types. For typical traits, huge numbers of variants contribute to heritability, in striking consistency with Fisher’s century-old infinitesimal model.

I summary: it’s universal pleiotropy. I don’t think there is any reason to settle on ”cellular” networks exclusively. After all, cells in a multicellular organism share a common pool of energy and nutrients, and exchange all kinds of signalling molecules. This agrees with classical models and the thinking in evolutionary genetics (see Rockman & Paaby 2013). Or look at this expression QTL and gene network study in aspen (Mähler & al 2017): the genes with eQTL tend to be peripheral, not network hub genes.

It’s a bit like in behaviour genetics, where people are fond of making up these elaborate hypothetical causal stories: if eyesight is heritable, and children with bad eyesight get glasses, and the way you treat a child who wears glasses somehow reinforces certain behaviours, so that children who wear glasses grow up to score a bit better on certain tests — are the eyesight variants also ”intelligence variants”? This is supposed to be a reductio ad absurdum of the idea of calling anything an ”intelligence variant” … But I suspect that this is what genetic causation, when fully laid out, will sometimes look like. It can be messy. It can involve elements that we don’t think of as ”relevant” to the trait.

There are caveats, of course:

One reason that there is a clearer enrichment of variant-level annotation such as open chromatin than in gene-level annotation may be that the resolution is higher. We don’t really know that much about how molecular variation translates to higher level trait variation. And let’s not forget that for most GWAS hits, we don’t know the causative gene.

They suggest defining ”core genes” like this: ”conditional on the genotype and expres-
sion levels of all core genes, the genotypes and expression levels of peripheral genes no longer matter”. Core genes are genes that d-separate the peripheral genes from a trait. That makes sense. Some small number of genes may be necessary molecular intermediates for a trait. But as far as I can tell, it doesn’t follow that useful biological information only comes from studying core genes, nor does it follow that we can easily tell if we’ve hit a core or a peripheral gene.

Also, there are quantitative genetics applications of GWAS data that are agnostic of pathways and genes. If we want to use genetics for prediction, for precision medicine etc, we do not really need to know the functions of the causative genes. We need big cohorts, well defined trait measurements, good coverage of genetic variants, and a good idea of environmental risk factors to feed into prediction models.

It’s pretty entertaining to see the popular articles about this paper, and the juxtaposition of quotes like ”that all those big, expensive genome-wide association studies may wind up being little more than a waste of time” (Gizmodo) with researchers taking the opportunity to bring up up their favourite hypotheses about missing heritability — even if it’s not the same people saying both things. Because if we want to study rare variants, or complex epistatic interactions, or epigenomics, or what have you, the studies will have to be just as big and expensive, probably even more so.

Just please don’t call it ”omnigenetics”.

Literature

Boyle, Evan A., Yang I. Li, and Jonathan K. Pritchard. ”An Expanded View of Complex Traits: From Polygenic to Omnigenic.” Cell 169.7 (2017): 1177-1186.

Mutation, selection, and drift (with Shiny)

Imagine a gene that comes in two variants, where one of them is deleterious to the carrier. This is not so hard to imagine, and it is often the case. Most mutations don’t matter at all. Of those that matter, most are damaging.

Next, imagine that the mutation happens over and over again with some mutation rate. This is also not so hard. After all, given enough time, every possible DNA sequence should occur, as if by monkeys and typewriters. In this case, since we’re talking about the deleterious mutation rate, we don’t even need exactly the same DNA sequence to occur; rather, what is important is how often a class of mutations with the same consequences happen.

Let’s illustrate this with a Shiny app! I made this little thing that draws graphs like this:

This is supposed to show the trajectory of a deleterious genetic variant, with sliders to decide the population size, mutation rate, selection, dominance, and starting frequency. The lines are ten replicate populations, followed for 200 generations. The red line is the estimated equilibrium frequency — where the population would end up if it was infinitely large and not subject to random chance.

The app runs here: https://mrtnj.shinyapps.io/mutation/
And the code is here: https://github.com/mrtnj/shiny_mutation

(Note: I don’t know how well this will work if every blog reader clicks on that link. Maybe it all crashes or the bandwidth runs out or whatnot. If so, you can always download the code and run in RStudio.)

We assume diploid genetics, random mating, and mutation only in one direction (broken genes never restore themselves). As in typical population genetics texts, we call the working variant ”A” and the working variant ”a”, and their frequencies p and q. The genotypes AA, Aa and aa will have frequencies p^2 , 2 p q and q^2 before selection.

Damaging variants tend to be recessive, that is, they hurt only when you have two of them. Imagine an enzyme that makes some crucial biochemical product, that you need some but not a lot of. If you have one working copy of the enzyme, you may be perfectly fine, but if you are left without any working copy, you will have a deficit. We can describe this by a dominance coefficient called h. If the dominance coefficient is one, the variant is completely dominant, so that it damages you even if you only have one copy. If the dominance coefficient is zero, the variant is completely recessive, and having one copy of it does not affect you at all.

The average reproductive success (”fitness”) of each genotype is described in terms of selection coefficients, which tells us how much selection there is against a genotype. Selection coefficients range from 0, which means that you’re winning, to 1 which means that you’ve been completely out-competed. For a recessive damaging variant, the AA homozygotes and Aa heterozygotes are unaffected, but the aa homozygotes suffers selection coefficient s.

In the general case, fitness values for each genotype are 1 for AA, 1 - hs for Aa and 1 - s for aa. We can think of this as the probability of contributing to the next generation.

What about the red line in the graphs? If natural selection keeps removing a mutation from the gene pool, and mutation keeps adding it back in again there may be some equilibrium frequency where they cancel out, and the frequency of the damaging variant is more or less constant. This is called mutation–selection balance.

Haldane (1937) came up with an expression for the equilibrium variant frequency:

q_{eq} = \frac {h s + \mu - \sqrt{ (hs - \mu)^2 + 4 s \mu } } {2 h s - 2 s}

I’ve changed his notation a bit to use h and s for dominance and selection coefficient. \mu is the mutation rate. It’s not easy to see what is going on here, but we can draw it in the graph, and see that it’s usually very small. In these small populations, where drift is a major player, the variants are often completely lost, or drift to higher frequency by chance.

(I don’t know if I can recommend learning by playing with an app, but I definitely learned things while making it. For instance that C++11 won’t work on shinyapps.io unless you send the compiler a flag, and that it’s important to remember that both variants in a diploid organism can mutate. So I guess what I’m saying is: don’t use my app, but make your own. Or something.)

Literature

Haldane, J. B. S. ”The effect of variation of fitness.” The American Naturalist 71.735 (1937): 337-349.

Den sura genetikern

Häromveckan skrev jag något kritiskt om vetenskap i medier. Det gör jag inte så ofta längre.

Det var en post om genetisk variation i MAOA-genen som kopplats till antisocialt beteende (med mera med mera) och dokumentären ”Ditt förutbestämda liv” som SVT sände ganska nyligen. Den går inte att se på SVT Play längre, men det finns en trailer i alla fall.

En gång i tiden så brukade jag läsa DN:s och SR:s vetenskapssidor och om jag hittade något intressant slå upp originalartiklarna, leta reda på pressmeddelanden, artiklar i engelskspråkiga tidningar som stått som förebild och så vidare. Ibland skrev jag kritiska brev och ibland postade jag länkar till originalartiklar, så de plockades upp av någon aggregator och länkades från nyhetsartikeln. Det var oskyldigare webbtider när nyhetstidningar var villiga att länka ogranskade bloggposter från sina artiklar. Men jag har nästan slutat med det, och när jag skriver något kritiskt gör det mig alltid lite nervös. Det är av flera anledningar:

1. Är det så viktigt att det är rätt?

Jag har förstås skaffat mig en massa onödigt bestämda åsikter om genetik, evolution och hur man bör uttrycka sig om dem. Det vore onödigt att tjafsa om alla dessa småsaker. Men jag tycker ändå att det är rimligt att kritisera beskrivningar av forskning som säger saker som inte är sanning, till exempel att ett par kandidatgenstudier från 2002-2003 är banbrytande och skriver om hela genetiken, eller att genetisk variation i MAOA är viktig för att förstå antisocialt beteende, när bevisen för det är i högsta grad skakiga. Dokumentären påstod till och med att Caspi et al 2003 (den om depression och serotonintransportgenen 5HTT) skulle vara en av världens mest refererade artiklar.

2. Tänk om jag har fel?

Det har jag ju ändå rätt ofta. Det finns en hel litteratur om MAOA, något tjog primärstudier eller så. De är, som jag skrev, en blandad kompott av positiva och negativa resultat (Foley & al 2004, Huang & al 2004, Haberstick & al 2005, Huizinga & al 2006, Kim-Cohen & al 2006, Nilsson & al 2006, Widom, Spatz & Brzustowicz 2006, Young & al 2006, Frazzetto & al 2007, Rief & al 2007, van der Vegt & al 2009, Weder & al 2009, Beach & al 2010, Derringer & al 2010, Edwards & al 2010, Enoch & al 2010). Det tyder på att effekten är för liten eller för variabel i förhållande till stickprovsstorleken. Knäckfrågan i det här fallet, som behövs för att kunna utvärdera både originalstudien och uppföljarna är: Om det nu skulle finnas en interaktion mellan varianter av MAOA och en dålig uppväxt, hur stor skulle den vara då? Tyvärr är det inte så lätt att veta.

Om vi skulle försöka oss på att rita en styrkekurva för interaktionen mellan MAOA och dålig uppväxt (Caspi & al 2002), det vill säga hur stor sannolikhet en studie av den här storleken har att hitta en effekt, så måste vi gissa vad en realistisk effekt skulle kunna vara. Artikeln gör en rad jämförelser, men om vi ska välja en så tycker jag det är rimligt att ta skillnaden mellan de som har riskvarianter och som inte blivit illa behandlade och de som har den och har blivit gravt illa behandlade under uppväxten. Om riskvarianter av MAOA verkligen gör människor mer sårbara för att bli illa behandlade under barndomen, så borde den här jämförelsen visa det. Vi behöver också välja en av variablerna att koncentrera oss på. Varför inte uppförandestörning (conduct disorder), vilket måste vara den som nämns i dokumentären.

Om vi simulerar data med olika oddskvoter (x-axeln; OR står för ”odds ratio”) och ritar en styrkekurva blir resultatet ungefär så här. (Obs, jag har läst av siffrorna från ett av diagrammen i artikeln. De är nog bara ungefär rätt.) Det vill säga, om vi antar samma andel ”gravt illa behandlade” individer och samma stickprovsstorlek, så ökar sannolikheten att hitta ett statistiskt signifikant resultat ungefär så här:

maoa_power

Det vill säga, den är inte särskilt stor. Vilka effektstorlekar kan vara rimliga? I samma artikel skattar de oddskvoten kopplad till att bli illa behandlad (hos de utan riskvarianten, och de är betydligt fler) till 2.5 för gravt illa behandlade och 1.3 för ”sannolikt” illa behandlade. Ficks & Waldman (2013) gjorde en metaanalys av studier med MAOA och antisocialt beteende (utan att ta hänsyn till interaktioner) och fick en oddskvot på 1.2. Rautiainen et al (2016) har gjort en helgenomsanalys av aggression hos vuxna och den största effekt de hittar är ungefär 2.2.

Men problemet med låg styrka är inte bara att det är svårt att få ett statistiskt signifikant resultat om det finns en stor och riktig skillnad. För om man, mot alla odds, hittar ett statistiskt signifikant resultat, hur stor ser effekten ut att vara? Den ser, med nödvändighet, ut att vara jättestor. Det här diagrammet visar den skattade effekten i simuleringar där resultatet var statistiskt signifikant (på 5%-nivån):

maoa_exaggeration

Men visst, det är förstås möjligt att de ursprungliga studierna hade tur med sina handfullar människor, att de som misslyckades med att detektera någon interaktion hade otur, och att MAOA-varianter kommer visa sig ha stora reproducerbara effekter när det efter hand börjar komma helgenomstudier som inkluderar interaktioner med miljövariabler. Jag håller inte andan.

(Koden bakom diagrammen finns på github. Förutom osäkerheten om vilken jämförelse som är den mest relevanta, så beror styrkan hos logistisk regression också på den konstanta termen, oddsen för beteendeproblem hos de som saknar riskvarianten. De är något fler än de som har den, men det är ändå en skattning med stor osäkerhet. Här har jag bara stoppat in den skattning jag fått ur data utläst ur diagrammet i Caspi & co 2002.)

3. Vill jag verkligen ha rollen som den professionella gnällspiken?

”Det finns en i varje familj. Två i min faktiskt.” Och det finns minst en på varje vetenskaplig konferens, i varje hörn av den vetenskapliga litteraturen, och på vetenskapsbloggar här och där … Alltså, någon som gjort det till sin uppgift att protestera, gärna med hög röst och blommigt språk, varje gång någon inte gör någon viss vetenskaplig idé rättvisa. Det finns förstås ett värde i kritik, och ingen har någon plikt att komma med ett bättre alternativ när de framför välgrundad kritik. Men det är ändå inte den skojigaste rollen, och det är inte riktigt vad jag vill viga mitt liv åt.

Så, varför inte skriva om något med arv och miljö som jag gillar? Här är en artikel jag såg publiceras ganska nyligen om förhållandet mellan arv, miljö och risk — i det här fallet handlar det om hjärtsjukdom.

Khera, Amit V., et al. ”Genetic Risk, Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle, and Coronary Disease.” New England Journal of Medicine (2016).

Den här studien vinner, ur mitt perspektiv, på att den inte bara koncentrerar sig på en enda gen, utan kombinerar information från varianter av ett gäng (femtio) gener där varianter tidigare kopplats till risk för hjärtsjukdom. När det gäller komplexa egenskaper som påverkas av många genetiska varianter är det här en mycket bättre idé. Det är antagligen till och med en nödvändighet för att dra några meningsfulla slutsatser om genetisk risk. De kombinerar också ett antal miljövariabler som antas påverka risken för hjärtsjukdom, det vill säga mer eller mindre hälsosamma vanor.

(Artikeln är tillgänglig gratis men inte licensierad under någon rimlig licens, så jag visar inte det diagram från artikeln jag skulle vilja visa här. Klicka på länken och titta på ”Figure 3” om du vill se det.)

Själva sensmoralen i ”Ditt förutbestämda liv” var att gener i och för sig spelar roll, men att en bra uppväxt är bra för alla. Det kan i och för sig gömma sig gen–miljöinteraktioner under de additiva effekter som den här studien bygger på, men sensmoralen blir ändå densamma: ett hälsosamt leverne verkar vara bra för alla, även de som haft otur med sina genetiska varianter och fått hög genetisk risk.

4. Det känns orättvist mot de som försökt kommunicera vetenskap, och kanske kontraproduktivt.

Tack och lov behöver jag sällan skriva om saker som är särskilt långt ifrån det jag är utbildad inom. Vetenskapsjournalister och -reportrar gör det desto oftare, och dessutom på begränsad tid. Oftast gäller det dessutom forskning som är alldeles ny, och därför extra svår att utvärdera. Men i det här fallet gäller det faktiskt forskning som är över tio år gammal, och både de som gjorde dokumentären och Vetenskapens värld som valde dess inramning i SVT misslyckades helt, tycker jag, med att sätta den i perspektiv. Jag vet inte om det är författarna själva eller dokumentärmakarna som är orsak till att vinkeln var enastående genombrott som inte behöver ifrågasättas eller nyanseras. Kanske är det orättvist att kräva av Vetenskapens värld-redaktionen att de ska anlägga ett annat perspektiv än dokumentären de valt att sända. Eftersom att jag gärna vill vill att reportrar och journalister ska skriva entusiastiskt om genetisk forskning (inklusive helst min egen), så tvekar jag lite att skriva ner dem med arga brev. Förhoppningsvis tar de inte allt för illa upp.

Litteratur

Ficks, Courtney A., and Irwin D. Waldman. ”Candidate genes for aggression and antisocial behavior: a meta-analysis of association studies of the 5HTTLPR and MAOA-uVNTR.” Behavior genetics 44.5 (2014): 427-444.

Rautiainen, M. R., et al. ”Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder.” Translational Psychiatry 6.9 (2016): e883.

Khera, Amit V., et al. ”Genetic Risk, Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle, and Coronary Disease.” New England Journal of Medicine (2016).

(Samt en massa kandidatgenstudier om MAOA som jag länkar ovan.)

Den ökända krigargenen möter Vetenskapens värld

SVT:s Vetenskapens värld sände nyligen (17 oktober, ”Ditt förutbestämda liv”) ett program om beteendegenetik. Det handlar om en studie i Dunedin, Nya Zeeland, som kopplar varianter av vissa gener, i kombination med påfrestande händelser under livets gång, till antisocialt beteende, depression med mera. SVT och dokumentären presenterar den som ”en oerhörd studie” som ”skrivit om den klassiska frågan om arv och miljö och visat att kombinationen är det avgörande”. Men det är snarare en stilstudie i hur välmenande forskare kan ha otur, dra förhastade slutsatser och skapa ett nystan av överdrifter. Otur och otur, förresten, för dem själva ledde det ju till berömmelse och dokumentärer som når ända till Sverige. Men för vetenskapen om den genetiska grunden för beteende var det ändå mest otur.

På 00-talet, när studierna ifråga publicerades, var beteendegenetiker väldigt optimistiska om vad som krävdes för att hitta gener som förklarar komplexa egenskaper, till exempel våldsamt beteende, depression med mera. Många trodde att det räckte att göra som i Dunedin, samla in data från kanske 1000 individer och välja ut en gen, en så kallad ”kandidatgen”, att studera. Komplexa egenskaper, som mänskligt beteende, kan visst ha en avsevärd ärftlig komponent. Men den består av hundratals, kanske tusentals, okända genetiska varianter med små effekter. Dagens genetik har gått vidare till att studera tiotusentals eller hundratusentals individer för att ha en chans att hitta några varianter, och till att studera alla gener samtidigt istället för att försöka gissa vilka kandidatgener som är viktiga.

Men tusen människor, hör jag er protestera, det är väl ändå många? I fallet MAOA tittar de bara på män, så där ryker hälften. Sedan är det ungefär en tredjedel av dem som har riskvarianten, och en bråkdel av dem som haft en dålig uppväxt. I dokumentären låter kopplingen mellan MAOA, dålig uppväxt och antisocialt beteende så övertygande. Richie Poulton, en av författarna, säger: ”Om man tittar på de killar som har riskvarianten av genen och som blev gravt illa behandlade, så uppvisade hela 85% av dem någon form av antisocialt beteende när de blivit vuxna [min översättning].” I själva verket, om man läser artikeln, så består gruppen han talar om – män med riskvarianten som blivit gravt illa behandlade under uppväxten – av 13 individer. De 85% han talar om är alltså elva män. Hur många av dem hade, enligt originalartikeln dömts för något våldsbrott vid 26 års ålder? Svaret är fyra. Med ett stickprov på 13 människor får man inga bra mått på vad riskvarianten har för effekt. Man får brus.

Och brus är precis vad som kommer ur kandidatgenstudier inom psykiatrisk genetik. Det går till ungefär så här: Någon hittar en kandidatgen i en liten studie, dåförtiden med stor buller och bång. Sedan kommer dussintals liknande studier med motsägelsefulla resultat. Ibland hittar de något liknande, ibland inte. Ibland hittar de en effekt på något annat: en interaktion med något nytt, en annan vagt relaterad egenskap. Efter hand börjar folk göra meta-analyser, som lägger ihop resultaten från många studier. De visar på stor variation och små effekter. Och så går det vidare. När det till slut börjar komma studier med större urval, som tittar på hela arvsmassan, så syns det (med några lysande undantag som apolipoprotein E) oftast inte ett spår av kandidatgenerna.

Men visst, ingen har tittat efter varianter i hela genomet med just de gen–miljöinteraktioner som var i Dunedinstudien. Och associationsstudier av hela genomet har hittills bara hittat varianter som kan förklara en bråkdel av den genetiska variationen. Så de gamla kandidatgensfavoriterna kanske också gömmer sig där ute, även om det inte ser ut så. Oavsett är det klart att de inte kan vara mer än en bråkdel av förklaringen, och att metoden att gissa kandidatgener och testa dem i små stickprov inte fungerar något vidare. Men på teve och i pressmeddelanden finns det aldrig komplikationer eller negativa resultat. Därför är MAOA också känd som ”the warrior gene”. Den är ett perfekt provokativt exempel att ta upp när man vill säga att människor är stenhårt programmerade av evolutionen att bete sig på ett visst sätt. Eller, som i den här dokumentären, när man vill komma ett mer humanistiskt budskap om hur uppväxten kan övervinna generna.

Författarna och dokumentärmakarna har såklart rätt i att både arv och miljö spelar roll för komplexa egenskaper. De har kanske till och med rätt att gen–miljöinteraktioner, där effekten av en viss genetisk variant bara visar sig under speciella miljöförhållanden, är viktiga. Men de har fel i att varianter i MAOA spelar en avgörande roll. Om MAOA-varianten har någon effekt alls, vilket inte ens är säkert, så är den bara en variant med liten effekt bland hundratals andra. Resultat som MAOA-associationen i Dunedin är inte några genombrott som skakar beteendegenetiken i grunden. De är ärliga misstag från en ung vetenskap som för 15 år sedan ännu inte hade lärt sig hur svårt det är att hitta gener som förklarar komplexa egenskaper. Istället för att älta dem är det dags att lämna kandidatgenerna bakom sig och gå vidare.

(Det här inlägget är lite försenat, för jag försökte få en kortare version av den här texten publicerad. Jag vet inte vad jag tänkte där. SVT Vetenskap har inte heller svarat. Den som läste den blev väl stött, eller avskrev den ungefär som en arg insändare. Nåja. Efter själva programmet var det ett par svenska forskare som fick vara med och prata lite. De var nog bra på sina ämnen, men ingen av dem verkade veta särskilt mycket om genetik, och sa inget kritiskt om själva innehållet. Ingen kritiserade heller det orimliga skrytet som dokumentären var full av. Jag förstår att jag framstår som en surgubbe nu, men det kan inte hjälpas.)

Litteratur

Caspi et al. (2002) ”Role of genotype in the cycle of violence in maltreated children.” Science

Caspi et al. (2003) ”Influence of life stress on depression: moderation by a polymorphism in the 5-HTT gene.” Science.